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xombiedirge:

EXCLUSIVE FIRST LOOK RELEASE DETAILS!! ON SALE TODAY!!!

The 12th Doctor by Matt Ferguson / Tumblr / Website / Twitter

8” X 11” numbered giclee print, timed edition release. Available today, for 24hrs only, beginning 12pm EST (4pm GMT), Sunday August 24th, 2014, from the Bottleneck Gallery / Facebook, HERE.

This marks the final piece (until the next regeneration) in the series that started last year at the 50th.Anniversary.

jurassiraptor:

Jurassic ParkAn illustrative tribute to the iconic feature by Tom Mac

jurassiraptor:

Jurassic Park
An illustrative tribute to the iconic feature by Tom Mac

starwars:

This concept painting by Erik Tiemens hits us right in the feels. Every time.

starwars:

This concept painting by Erik Tiemens hits us right in the feels. Every time.

(Source: olivrsm)

edharrington:

"HanniBelle" Lecter & "Buffalo" Bill

edharrington:

"HanniBelle" Lecter & "Buffalo" Bill

betterknowariff:

The hivemind seems to think this is from the MST3K episode Bride of the Monster (queued up to the right scene here). This is out of my usual area because I try to stay away from self-referential riffs and call-backs and just try to focus on external sources.

But, falling more under this blog’s umbrella, we have two other possible sources;

  • There was one vote for the poppy scene Wizard of Oz. This a possibility because Oz riffs are so common on MST3K. 
  • howtoraiseageek brought to my attention a possibility in Marshall Sylver,a hypnotist/comedian who did a few bits on the David Letterman show in the 80’s. He would also command people to sleep.

The short answer is, Anonymous Asker, it could be any or all of these things.

They’re all right.  

The thing of it is, “SLEEEP!” was first used in episode 302 … a season before Bride of the Monster was riffed.  Doesn’t mean it wasn’t in their pile of tapes, though.  (Witness Coily and Crow’s “No more waffles!” segment seasons before.)  I’m going to guess they watched a slew of tapes before season three, one of them being Bride, and “SLEEEEP!” stuck with them well before they got around to actually doing that episode.

(PS: I’ve written the riffs for all of season two and three for the site, but they just haven’t been posted yet.)

(Source: usscucuboth)

My eleven-year-old son and I made a list of Universal monster movies and we’re watching and reviewing them.
Today’s film is Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

My son will go first:

this time (it’s personal) we have Bride of Frankenstein (’s Monster) which is where a few seconds after the first movie, the monster is still alive and roams a forest.  He meets a friend and they get separated the next day but what he sees will shock him: a “Bride” for him to love. But unfortunately the brain of the “Wife” is a young teen who got killed by him and is still terrified of him. The Monster is so mad that he blows the place sky high (Don’t ask how he did it) .
So, rating wise, i’ll say 4.5 out of 5 Awesome creeps of creepiness!!!

(The Monster killed the teen whose brain was used for the Bride?)
My turn:

Some revere this film more than the original.  I don’t.
For me, this movie tries too hard to drive home the morality play aspects.  That’s obvious from the very beginning when we’re treated to a segment with Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and Mary Shelley (played by the Bride, Elsa Lanchester) wherein the author of the original work says, straight up, it’s about the morals and not the monsters.
The heavy-handedness continues with Dr. Pretorius and his pressuring of Henry Frankenstein into making a mate for his Monster.  Pretorius wants Henry to fly in the face of God and continue his work.  Make a whole race of monsters.  This presentation of Pretorius as a godless man trying to entice Frankenstein into a scientific Faustian bargain continues to the extreme when, sitting in a tomb after having robbed a casket, drinks, eats and toasts a pile of bones.  Then the Monster appears and says:

For Pretorius, this is fine.  He was always presented as death-worshipping and amoral.  For the Monster, this turn bothers me a bit.  
In the last movie and this one, the Monster actually tries to help people or at least be nice to them.  The little girl he killed in the original was an accident; he was just playing.  He tried to rescue a girl when she fell into water in this one.  And, in one of the franchise’s most touching sequences, he befriends a blind hermit.  They are friends … we don’t know for how long, but long enough for the monster to have learned some language skills and to be genuinely happy.  He saw the goodness of the living.  And yet, just a few scenes later, he’s given up on it?  
Even though it doesn’t ring true to me, the Monster hangs with the living long enough to get a girl from them.  A dead girl, sure, but a girl, nonetheless.  The Bride, however, lacks some social skills and is revolted by the Monster.  So the Monster decides to kill himself (instead of trying to endear himself to her), the Bride and Pretorius, saying, “We belong dead.”  But only after letting Henry Frankenstein escape.
What is up with Henry Frankenstein?  Somehow, he has escaped comeuppance in two movies.  He says he doesn’t like what he’s done and yet, as soon as Pretorius gets him into the lab, he’s eagerly counting the beats on hearts.  He’s screaming, “She’s alive!”  He’s not as unwilling as he might protest.  Not by a long shot.  Yes, Elizabeth was being held hostage but at no point does it seems like Henry is working under duress.
Plus, the villagers never come for him, bearing pitchforks and torches.  One of the hunters mentions that the Monster was made from dead bodies by Frankenstein (after having found out, somehow), but there are no calls for Henry’s head.  How come?
Beyond these philosophical and plot objections, what else is wrong?  Comic relief, again.  It’s really unbearable in these early films.  Una O’Connor, again, is James Whale’s muse of screeching annoyance as a housemaid for the Frankenstein’s.  (Several of her line deliveries reminded me of Augra from The Dark Crystal.)  
Also, Pretorius’ homunculi.  Tiny little people dressed as a king, queen, archbishop, dancer, etc.  It’s just … ridiculous.  It’s a grossly unnecessary diversion.  (Really well-done effects, but still.)  I understand the need for Pretorius to prove that he’s of the same mind as Henry, but something better could have been devised.
What’s great?  Karloff, of course. … The makeup, too.  The Monster looks like he was burned and his hair singed.  As the movie progresses, he looks like he’s healing. … The editing and cinematography of the Bride’s “activation” is very well done. … Elsa Lanchester is striking. … It was nice having Colin Clive back, even though he was unfortunately displaced by Pretorius.  That, to me, is one of the biggest failings of this film.  Frankenstein should be the driving force.  Period.  … It was nice seeing Dwight Frye (Renfield/Fritz) again, too.  His role as a murderous graverobber was too shortlived, for me. … John Carradine, who would later play Dracula in some of the films on our list, appears as one of the hunters who finds the Monster at the hermit’s house. … We got a different Elizabeth Frankenstein.  She was a powerful force, but not in the movie long enough to really matter.  The title being Bride of Frankenstein, I think they could have expanded her role to lend the proceedings more duality.
Young Frankenstein connections … obviously, Madeline Kahn’s hair. … Minnie the annoying housemaid leads, in some small measure, to Frau Blücher (whinny). … Near the end, Henry yells for Elizabeth to “Get beck!”  Not “back.”  This mispronunciation led to the “Put ze candle beck” scene, I’m sure.
Man, it sounds like I’m very down on this movie.  I’m not, really.  I just have problems with it.
Bride of Frankenstein … a heavy-handed and unfortunately goofy-in-the-first-half classic.  3.75 out of five creeps.

Here’s a re-release trailer:

Next, Dracula’s Daughter.
(GIFs from missviciousuniverse and dianavondergeist)

My eleven-year-old son and I made a list of Universal monster movies and we’re watching and reviewing them.

Today’s film is Bride of Frankenstein (1935).

My son will go first:

this time (it’s personal) we have Bride of Frankenstein (’s Monster) which is where a few seconds after the first movie, the monster is still alive and roams a forest.  He meets a friend and they get separated the next day but what he sees will shock him: a “Bride” for him to love. But unfortunately the brain of the “Wife” is a young teen who got killed by him and is still terrified of him. The Monster is so mad that he blows the place sky high (Don’t ask how he did it) .

So, rating wise, i’ll say 4.5 out of 5 Awesome creeps of creepiness!!!

(The Monster killed the teen whose brain was used for the Bride?)

My turn:

Some revere this film more than the original.  I don’t.

For me, this movie tries too hard to drive home the morality play aspects.  That’s obvious from the very beginning when we’re treated to a segment with Percy Shelley, Lord Byron and Mary Shelley (played by the Bride, Elsa Lanchester) wherein the author of the original work says, straight up, it’s about the morals and not the monsters.

The heavy-handedness continues with Dr. Pretorius and his pressuring of Henry Frankenstein into making a mate for his Monster.  Pretorius wants Henry to fly in the face of God and continue his work.  Make a whole race of monsters.  This presentation of Pretorius as a godless man trying to entice Frankenstein into a scientific Faustian bargain continues to the extreme when, sitting in a tomb after having robbed a casket, drinks, eats and toasts a pile of bones.  Then the Monster appears and says:

For Pretorius, this is fine.  He was always presented as death-worshipping and amoral.  For the Monster, this turn bothers me a bit.  

In the last movie and this one, the Monster actually tries to help people or at least be nice to them.  The little girl he killed in the original was an accident; he was just playing.  He tried to rescue a girl when she fell into water in this one.  And, in one of the franchise’s most touching sequences, he befriends a blind hermit.  They are friends … we don’t know for how long, but long enough for the monster to have learned some language skills and to be genuinely happy.  He saw the goodness of the living.  And yet, just a few scenes later, he’s given up on it?  

Even though it doesn’t ring true to me, the Monster hangs with the living long enough to get a girl from them.  A dead girl, sure, but a girl, nonetheless.  The Bride, however, lacks some social skills and is revolted by the Monster.  So the Monster decides to kill himself (instead of trying to endear himself to her), the Bride and Pretorius, saying, “We belong dead.”  But only after letting Henry Frankenstein escape.

What is up with Henry Frankenstein?  Somehow, he has escaped comeuppance in two movies.  He says he doesn’t like what he’s done and yet, as soon as Pretorius gets him into the lab, he’s eagerly counting the beats on hearts.  He’s screaming, “She’s alive!”  He’s not as unwilling as he might protest.  Not by a long shot.  Yes, Elizabeth was being held hostage but at no point does it seems like Henry is working under duress.

Plus, the villagers never come for him, bearing pitchforks and torches.  One of the hunters mentions that the Monster was made from dead bodies by Frankenstein (after having found out, somehow), but there are no calls for Henry’s head.  How come?

Beyond these philosophical and plot objections, what else is wrong?  Comic relief, again.  It’s really unbearable in these early films.  Una O’Connor, again, is James Whale’s muse of screeching annoyance as a housemaid for the Frankenstein’s.  (Several of her line deliveries reminded me of Augra from The Dark Crystal.)  

Also, Pretorius’ homunculi.  Tiny little people dressed as a king, queen, archbishop, dancer, etc.  It’s just … ridiculous.  It’s a grossly unnecessary diversion.  (Really well-done effects, but still.)  I understand the need for Pretorius to prove that he’s of the same mind as Henry, but something better could have been devised.

What’s great?  Karloff, of course. … The makeup, too.  The Monster looks like he was burned and his hair singed.  As the movie progresses, he looks like he’s healing. … The editing and cinematography of the Bride’s “activation” is very well done. … Elsa Lanchester is striking. … It was nice having Colin Clive back, even though he was unfortunately displaced by Pretorius.  That, to me, is one of the biggest failings of this film.  Frankenstein should be the driving force.  Period.  … It was nice seeing Dwight Frye (Renfield/Fritz) again, too.  His role as a murderous graverobber was too shortlived, for me. … John Carradine, who would later play Dracula in some of the films on our list, appears as one of the hunters who finds the Monster at the hermit’s house. … We got a different Elizabeth Frankenstein.  She was a powerful force, but not in the movie long enough to really matter.  The title being Bride of Frankenstein, I think they could have expanded her role to lend the proceedings more duality.

Young Frankenstein connections … obviously, Madeline Kahn’s hair. … Minnie the annoying housemaid leads, in some small measure, to Frau Blücher (whinny). … Near the end, Henry yells for Elizabeth to “Get beck!”  Not “back.”  This mispronunciation led to the “Put ze candle beck” scene, I’m sure.

Man, it sounds like I’m very down on this movie.  I’m not, really.  I just have problems with it.

Bride of Frankenstein … a heavy-handed and unfortunately goofy-in-the-first-half classic.  3.75 out of five creeps.

Here’s a re-release trailer:

Next, Dracula’s Daughter.

(GIFs from missviciousuniverse and dianavondergeist)

edharrington:

The first movie I saw in a movie theater.

edharrington:

The first movie I saw in a movie theater.

herochan:

Muddy Business
Created by Jose Neves

herochan:

Muddy Business

Created by Jose Neves

g1988:

The artwork from Dave Perillo’s awesome solo show, “Squares 4 Squares,” is now online and available for purchase!
http://nineteeneightyeight.com/collections/dave-perillo-squares-4-squares

g1988:

The artwork from Dave Perillo’s awesome solo show, “Squares 4 Squares,” is now online and available for purchase!

http://nineteeneightyeight.com/collections/dave-perillo-squares-4-squares

unmistakablymistaken:

"What an interesting pizza cutter"

(Ready to correct him … reads username.)

Carry on.

fuckyeahmst3k:

For all of you Rifftrax fans.

(Source: vaderblues)

betterknowariff:

I lost the original message, but someone asked about “Sleeeeeeep.” Anyone who know where this comes from want to help me out on this?

Here’s what I typed for AnnotatedMST.com, for episode 302, Gamera:

A favorite riff of MST3K’s, usually employed whenever someone is nodding off or just seems dazed.  This appears to be the first occurrence of it.  While it may be a reference to cheeseball hypnotists, it could also be a direct impression of Bela Lugosi’s hypnotic ways in 1931’s Dracula and 1956’s Bride of the Monster (MST3K episode 423).  One last, random possibility: in the 1980s, supposed “World’s Fastest Hypnotist” Marshall Sylver appeared on several TV shows, including Late Night with David Letterman, where he would entrance people while barking, “Sleep!” at them.

huffingtonpost:

Just take a moment and appreciate how great this is and then go here to see more great works of art transformed with pop culture. 
(By  David Barton)

huffingtonpost:

Just take a moment and appreciate how great this is and then go here to see more great works of art transformed with pop culture. 

(By  David Barton)